Jazz Through the Salish Sea

Young jazz musicians playing on Water Street

I don’t know how many photos get taken through the “Salish Sea Circle” sculpture in Downtown Port Townsend. Families line up behind the sculpture. You can photograph the Northwest Maritime Center through the circle. I’ve even taken moon photos through the piece.

Here we see three of four young jazz musicians playing in the plaza just west of the sculpture on Water Street. One of the young men was wearing a Roosevelt Jazz t-shirt. Roosevelt High School in Seattle has a well regarded jazz music program and I’m assuming that these guys were here for Centrum’s Jazz Port Townsend, which is running this week.

Feed me Mama

Crow feeding young

We heard the strangest crow calls. We can recognize a few different calls but this was different, loud, insistent and demanding. One crow landed on our roof then two more alighted soon after. The two must have been babies because they followed the first with their beaks open, insisting on being fed.

Those are babies only a mother could love.

Fort Flagler Playground

Equipment not being played with on this cold and cloudy day

As we head into what is supposed to be a lovely weekend, here’s one last (hopefully) photo that shows the weather we’ve been having. This is a playground in Fort Flagler State Park. We went there a few days ago to walk on the beach. We did, that is until the cold wind and rain forced us back to the car.

Sunset Rainbow

Sunset and a rainbow combine to ignite the sky

I was looking out the living room window and noticed a rainbow above the barn across the street, and went out to see the most intense rainbow I can remember. The light bled off the rainbow to smudge the clouds next nearby. There are some benefits to the rainy weather Port Townsend has been experiencing.

Sequim Lavender Festival Bike

photo of sequim lavender festival bicycle
The official bicycle of the Sequim Lavender Festival

About 15 years ago some people moved into the Sequim, Wa area and started growing lavender. For growing purposes the North Olympic Peninsula has some similarities to Provence, so it was a good idea. The growers started an annual lavender festival, showing their farms and selling products made from lavender.

The festival grew and now the weekend of the Sequim Lavender Festival brings the worst traffic of the year to highway 101 along the North Olympic Peninsula. We braved the trip anyway. As you can see, the weather was less than ideal. We ended up leaving Friday afternoon in the rain. It was wet on and off until Sunday lunch time. I went to shoot photos of the lavender fields, which didn’t happen. Not only was the light heavy and flat, much of the blooms hadn’t reached full color yet, as the summer has been so cold.

This bicycle was placed by the entrance to the Lavender Festival merchant booths in downtown Sequim. There was another group of food and vendor booths at Carrie Blake Park. That belonged to the Sequim Lavender Faire, which is apparently a separate event that happens the same weekend. There are a lot of politics involved, which I don’t understand. We had a good time anyway.