Colorful Gardening Tools

A rainbow of watering wands

I got a couple of stares as I photographed these watering wands in Hadlock Building Supply, in Port Hadlock. I’m sure that explaining that I’m a blogger fully convinced the starers that I’m nuts.

For years, garden tools and hoses were green. There’s nothing wrong with green, other than it’s easier to lose something in the plants. But I find the bright Crayola colors of this year’s tools cheery and fun.

Juno Iris

A new iris for our garden

I know that I’ve been posting a lot of flower closeups lately. What can I say? They’re blooming, beautiful, and the night’s rain left those lovely water drops on the petals. This is a Juno Iris (Iris bucharica), which has distinctive corn plant like leaves.

My project for this spring is to learn how to use my macro lens to best effect. I’ll try to keep the number of flower shots down to one a week or so. No promises.

Chimacum Creek

Lower Chimacum Creek at low tide
Lower Chimacum Creek at low tide

There is only one stream on the upper Quimper Peninsula that runs year round, Chimacum Creek. It is used by chum salmon for spawning and has seen quite a bit of habitat restoration. Here it flows through a tidal flat where it meets Port Townsend Bay in Irondale.

This area used to be a storage dump for logging operations. Now it is a county park.

Garden Equipment

Front Loader for Rent at Henery Hardware
Front Loader for Rent at Henery Hardware

We’re told that life is all a matter of perspective. Nowhere is that more true than in photography. This tractor looks large, yet it’s actually cute and less than four feet tall. The effect is not done in Photoshop. Other than turning the image to black and white and adding the sharpening that’s necessary for all raw photos, nothing was done to the image. The apparent size of the equipment is totally the result of camera positioning.

On Photography and Seeing

Nylon scrub pad
Nylon scrub pad

I take photos every day. Despite knowing better, I hold the continual hope of capturing a stunning image each time I shoot. Often the images are nothing more than snapshots taken with my pocket camera, a simple record. Other times I spend hours hauling around my fancier camera and tripod. Equipment mostly doesn’t matter. Despite averaging nearly 200 shots a week I feel lucky to get a handful of captures I’m happy with.

Yet, there’s a side effect to spending so much time behind a camera that has nothing to do with producing gallery quality photos. The way I view the world has fundamentally shifted. Looking is giving way to seeing. People, plants, animals, landscapes, whatever aren’t just objects to be identified. I’m seeing light, color, shapes and patterns in a way I hadn’t realized was possible just two years ago. Ordinary objects like this scrubby reveal, beyond utilitarian function,  a previously unnoticed beauty. Simply put, the world is a more interesting place.

Obviously, this realization is nothing new. Fellow Port Townsend photo blogger, Nina quotes Henry Miller, who summarizes the situation, “A destination is never a place but rather a new way of looking at things.” In context that might read, photography is never about photographs but rather continually gaining a new way of looking at things.”